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Search: 07/2009

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Board of Directors

Bruce Miller, President

Bruce Miller is a professor of law at Western New England College, where he teaches constitutional law and other public law subjects.  His public service work includes serving on the Board of Directors of the Pioneer Valley HIV-AIDS Consortium and the Advisory Board of the Western Massachusetts ACLU. He is also a trustee of the Rosenberg Fund for Children.

Tallahassee Interfaith Coalition

Tallahassee coalition

Location

Tallahassee, Florida
--
Tallahassee, FL 32301
United States

 

Colleague Organizations

The following organizations support the mission of No More Guantánamos.  We are proud to collaborate with them.

Advisory Board

Buz Eisenberg

Buz Eisenberg is a civil rights attorney who represents six Guantánamo detainees.  He is President of the International Justice Network, the only non-governmental organization currently providing legal representation to detainees held abroad in the “War on Terror.”  He also teaches law-related topics at Greenfield Community College in Greenfield, Massachusetts.

Detainees at Guantanamo Bay

Andy Worthington has prepared a list of all the detainees and their current status, which he has posted on his blog. He has also prepared a list of all federal district court rulings on Guantanamo detainees' habeas corpus petitions.

NYC for Guantanamo Justice

New York City coalition

Location

New York, NY 10025
United States

Indefinite Detention: If it starts at Guantanamo, where will it end?

By: 
Nancy Talanian
Date: 
07/03/2009

 

From the "too good to be true" department, President Obama's promise in January to close Guantanamo Bay prison isn't turning out to be nearly as good as it sounded.  Now the president is talking about signing an executive order to authorize himself to detain 50-100 Guantánamo prisoners (up to about half the current population) indefinitely—without charges and without trials—on the basis of what he or others think they might do in the future if they are released.  That sounds a lot like what Guantánamo has been and is today.