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Search: 2010

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Congress Receives Misleading Report about Guantanamo "Recidivism"

By: 
Nancy Talanian
Date: 
12/09/2010

Read this blog on Huffington Post.

Why We Exist: Closing Guantánamo the Right Way

By: 
Nancy Talanian
Date: 
11/15/2010

When Guantánamo Bay prison will actually close is anyone’s guess, but the closing alone will not matter unless our country changes along with it and our government, going forward, affirms its commitment to human rights and the rule of law. As we near the ninth anniversary of Guantánamo Bay prison, we are constantly bombarded with signs that such a day is still far off. Here are a few culled from recent news:

Abdul Aziz Naji

In July of 2010, the Obama administration transferred Mr. Naji to Algeria, against his will. On November 3, 2010, Mr. Naji's legal team—Ellen Lubell and Doris Tennantissued the following update on their client, including a request for funds to cover mental health care and a prosthetic leg. The excellent prosthetic Mr. Naji was wearing when he was turned over to the U.S. was broken during his torture, and the U.S. replaced it with one that fit so badly that he was unable to walk.

Shawali Khan

Shawali Khan was an Afghan shopkeeper who was sold for a bounty.  He was ordered released twice, but he lost his habeas bid on September 3rd.  Read his story on Andy Worthington's blog site here.

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Mothers of Iran's detainees fare better than parents of US detainees

By: 
Nancy Talanian
Date: 
05/20/2010

Read this blog on Huffington Post.

Pre-trial Hearing of 1st Obama Military Commission Tries Child Soldier

By: 
Nancy Talanian
Date: 
05/07/2010

The pre-trial hearing for the first Military Tribunal in Obama’s presidency began last week, following the delayed release of the new manual for Military Commissions.  The government’s justification for trying Omar Khadr by Military Commission is that, in its view, his alleged murder of a US soldier via a hand grenade was a violation of the law of war. According to Lt. Col. David Frakt, under the Military Commission rules, “A detainee may be convicted of murder in violation of the law of war even if they did not actually violate the law of war.”